Business

95% of executives think about their work at home at night

“Well, I'll have to take the time to study the Machin file and also that I send an email Bidule Ah thin, I have to hold a meeting for the brief Thing with Chef …” The finding is edifying (and at the same time, not surprisingly): According to an Ifop survey for the start-up Mooncard on the professional mental load, 95% of the executives interviewed say that they sometimes think about their work in the evening when returning to the house, and 60% even say that it happens to them “often”! The work is inviting in the private sphere and for everyone: “Contrary to popular belief, the number of executives in the public sector who say they think of work at home (67%) is more important than those in the private sector (59%) says Tristan Leteurtre, co-founder of Mooncard, and the provincials, despite their quality of life, think as much as Parisians or Parisians “.

Similarly, age does not matter. Young people, often described as less engaged in the business, are as numerous as their elders to think about work after the day's work: 58% of people under 35 think “often” against 59% of over 35s. Finally, the subject concerns almost as much men (58%) as women (64%).

And if it were only in the evening … Problem: 94% think about it at the weekend, 62% doing sports (and 69% for under 35s), and even 20% … doing love. In the latter case, the situation is almost as frequent among men (19%) as among women (22%) and concerns more particularly young people (26% of those under 35). “This professional mental burden is dangerous for the personal, family and conjugal life, even the health of the executives”, indicates Tristan Leteurtre. Those who think very often about work at home are 75% to experience “often” problems of sleep, 57% to know tensions in their couple while 73% of the respondents declare having “often” difficulties to reconcile professional life and personal life.

Parents more concerned

Having a family does not help disconnecting: those with two or more children are much more likely to think about work over the weekend than those who do not (65% vs. 47%). ). “It can be postulated that parents are forced – more than others – to anticipate their upcoming work week by juggling predictable family constraints,” suggests Tristan Leteurtre.

Syndrome of the “overflowing vase”

According to Mooncard, executives are struck by the “overflowing vase syndrome”. 81% of managers say they have more things to do overall than before, 74% receive too many e-mails and 77% have “too many tasks to manage at the same time”. The most painful? Email management and frequency of meetings (63%), reporting requirements (59%) and management of expense reports (41%). As a result, executives gain stress on their private lives. 85% of employees “often” stressed in their professional life think “often” at work in the evening, twice more than those who say “rarely” stressed.

As a result, the exhaustion is on the lookout: 80% of executives say that they happen to have “the impression that they will not get away with it”, 36% even “often” feeling this sensation. Those who think very often about working in the evening are also twice as likely to judge that their work generates “often” tensions with their spouse or relatives: 58%, far ahead of those who think “from time to time” (27 %) and very far ahead of those who never think about it (17%). “This is a warning signal and companies must also react to lighten some processes, says Tristan Leteurtre. It is sometimes very difficult to disconnect, despite the law in force, but for example, in our company, we avoid all meetings after 17 hours to avoid constraints to our employees. “So everyone has to find solutions.

“Well, I'll have to take the time to study the Machin file and also that I send an email Bidule Ah thin, I have to hold a meeting for the brief Thing with Chef …” The finding is edifying (and at the same time, not surprisingly): According to an Ifop survey for the start-up Mooncard on the professional mental load, 95% of the executives interviewed say that they sometimes think about their work in the evening when returning to the house, and 60% even say that it happens to them “often”! The work is inviting in the private sphere and for everyone: “Contrary to popular belief, the number of executives in the public sector who say they think of work at home (67%) is more important than those in the private sector (59%) says Tristan Leteurtre, co-founder of Mooncard, and the provincials, despite their quality of life, think as much as Parisians or Parisians “.

Similarly, age does not matter. Young people, often described as less engaged in the business, are

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