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Lafarge no longer prosecuted for “complicity in crimes against humanity”, but remains indicted for “financing of terrorism”

To maintain its factory in northern Syria at all costs, the cement company is suspected of having financed until 2014 several terrorist organizations in Syria, including Daesh.

The Paris court of appeal has overturned the prosecution for “complicity in crimes against humanity” against the Lafarge group, learned franceinfo judicial source Thursday, November 7. On the other hand, the French cement manufacturer remains under investigation for “violation of the embargo”, “endangering the lives of these employees”, “financing of terrorism”, the source said. Eight executives and leaders of the group are pursued in this case including former CEO of the group, Bruno Lafont.

To maintain its factory in northern Syria at all costs, Lafarge is suspected of having financed until 2014 several terrorist organizations in Syria, including Daesh.

>> Four questions to understand the ups and downs of the Lafarge affair in Syria

The cement company is not only being sued for violating the EU's 2011 embargo against Syria, but also for knowingly endangering some of the local workers at its Jallabiya plant in the north. Syria as armed Islamist organizations threatened the site.

The cement manufacturer Lafarge is also suspected of having paid via its Syrian subsidiary very large sums (more than 13 million euros) to these same armed groups, including the Islamic State and the al-Nusra Front, a group affiliated to Al- Qaeda. These regular payments in effect since 2012 were supposed to ensure the protection of the factory and its activity during the war in Syria.

The judges are also investigating the possibility that Lafarge has sold tens of thousands of tons of cement to Daesh. The group is implicated for financing a terrorist company.

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